Understand the features of effective team performance within a health and social care or children and young people’s setting Explain the features of effective team performance You can use the cycle of Bruce Tuckman’s 1965 Theory of ‘Forming

Understand the features of effective team performance within a health and social care or children and young people’s setting

Explain the features of effective team performance

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You can use the cycle of Bruce Tuckman’s 1965 Theory of ‘Forming, Storming, Norming and Performing’, to show the stages of team performance and development

‘Norming’ and ‘Performing’ stage, shows features of effective team performance
The team have a clear shared sense of purpose in line with organisational objectives and all members of the team work towards achieving these goals, understanding their own role in the team and their part in the outcome.

Identify the challenges experienced by developing teams

The challenges to developing teams can be seen in the ‘Forming’ and ‘Storming’ stages. At these stages team members are still getting to know each other and have not yet established respect and trust. They are unaware of each other’s abilities, skills or knowledge, and have not experienced success together.
There may also team members trying to exert their dominance within the team, this can cause conflict and be destructive at this stage delaying the building of trust and respect. Individual agendas may then take precedence over common team goals and objectives and this can lead to personal conflicts between staff.
Some members may not feel comfortable speaking up or may feel intimidated by other people, so communication can be difficult.

Identify the challenges experienced by established teams

The challenges experienced by established teams is that having experienced success, they can become unmotivated, feeling that they have done all they can within the confines of the team and may seek to move on to new experiences and challenges.
This can lead to new members being introduced to the team, which then then can begin the Tuckman’s cycle all over again and return to the ‘Forming’ stage, and new recruits to the team can be met with suspicion and lack of acceptance.
Individuals and the team may become stuck in the existing methods of working and become resistant to change, or adapting to new working procedures, policies or guidelines.

Explain how challenges to effective team performance can be overcome

Challenges to effective team performance can be overcome by continuing to motivate the team and encouraging them to share skills and knowledge. This can be done through effective communication,
Team meetings where new initiatives and ways of working are discussed, and ways agreed of how to implement them into the workplace.
Encouraging a positive attitude toward change and seeing it as opportunity rather than something to be feared and discussing and promoting the team’s objectives. Team successes can be shared which promotes the ‘feel good’ factor.
Supervisions, where appropriate individual team members can be motivated through praising and identifying good work and encouraging them to pass these approaches on to colleagues it is important to ensure staff remain happy in the workplace and discuss and resolve any issues that are affecting them
Personal Development Review operational objectives are used to set individual objectives so that the team member remains ‘connected’ to and a part of the wider service.

Analyse how different styles of leadership and management can influence outcomes of team performance

Different styles of leadership and management can influence outcomes of team performance in different ways. A successful manager should be able to blend different styles dependent on circumstances to achieve positive outcomes.
Autocratic management style involves the manager being the decision maker and passing these decisions to staff for them to be carried out, staff are not consulted in the process. There will not be a sense of team performance, and staff are unable to feel as though they are part of any positive outcomes. Due to not being consulted they would feel unable to make suggestions as their views are not encouraged.
As decisions are made solely by the manager none of the positives of effective teamwork can be enjoyed. Success and failure lie only with the manager. Leaving the staff feeling undervalued and as a result pride and quality of their work would reduce
Autocratic management may be successful when reacting to immediate situations that require immediate decisions, but as a blanket management style is ultimately flawed.
This can be seen in McGregor’s Theory X view of workers.

Democratic management style involves staff in the decision-making process. Communication is two-way Manager and staff work together and staff is encouraged to put forward their ideas and viewpoints. Sharing the success and failures and are more likely to be committed and motivated toward positive outcomes. Staff feel empowered and part of the organisation.
An issue with democratic management is that decisions are not immediate, meetings must be organised and undertaken, communication must be effective, and these things can take time, this can be seen in McGregor’s Theory Y view of workers.

Analyse methods of developing and maintaining trust and accountability

To develop and maintain trust and accountability which supports the feeling of being valued and empowered promoting a positive staff team This can be described as the ‘Norming’ stage where all staff have clear understanding or team and individual roles and positive behaviours a clear understanding of the job requirements set down in the organisation job descriptions and organisational structure staff can see what their own role responsibilities and for what they are accountable for.
Policies, procedures and guidelines must be in place and understood, clearly defining levels of accountability.
Using the Annual Performance Development Review with objectives linked in to organisational objectives and supervisions staff can see their own responsibilities and accountabilities.
Effective team work will often have outcomes where staff agree to undertake certain actions. As a senior it is part of my role to support the individual to complete the tasks by ensuring they have the knowledge skills, abilities, training and equipment to carry out the tasks

As a senior I must show the same positive behaviours expected from the staff team, to follow through with agreed actions of my own and maintain a positive approach to work and my colleagues.
Staff must be treated equally and fairly in all areas, including the organisation of rotas, the sharing of tasks, allocation of leave and treated with equal dignity and respect.
As a senior I must ensure that I maintain confidentiality with staff, that supervisions remain confidential and that staff feel encouraged and supported to speak their minds, creating an environment where staff feel relaxed and confident, not only with myself as a senior but with each other as a team to provide a supportive workplace.

Compare methods of addressing conflicts within a team

Comparing methods of addressing conflicts within a team using the Direct Approach, Bargaining, Enforcement, Retreat, and De-emphasis (Nelson, 1995), which states
Direct Approach: This may be the best approach of all. It concentrates on the leader confronting the issue head-on. Though conflict is uncomfortable to deal with, it is best to look at issues objectively and to face them as they are. If criticism is used, it must be constructive to the recipients. This approach counts on the techniques of problem-solving and normally leaves everyone with a sense of resolution, because issues are brought to the surface and dealt with.
Bargaining: This is an excellent technique when both parties have ideas on a solution yet cannot find common ground. Often a third party, such as a team leader, is needed to help find the compromise. Compromise involves give and take on both sides, however, and usually ends up with both walking away equally dissatisfied.
Enforcement of Team Rules: Avoid using this method if possible, it can bring about hard feelings toward the leader and the team. This technique is only used when it is obvious that a member does not want to be a team player and refuses to work with the rest. If enforcement has to be used on an individual, it may be best for that person to find another team.
Retreat: Only use this method when the problem isn’t real to begin with. By simply avoiding it or working around it, a leader can often delay long enough for the individual to cool off. When used in the right environment by an experienced leader this technique can help to prevent minor incidents that are the result of someone having a bad day from becoming real problems that should never have occurred.
De-emphasis: This is a form of bargaining where the emphasis is on the areas of agreement. When parties realize that there are areas where they are in agreement, they can often begin to move in a new direction.

Be able to support a positive culture within the team for a health and social care or young peoples setting

Identify the components of a positive culture within own team

Cross reference 1.1 and 1.6

Demonstrate how own practice supports a positive culture in the team

Cross reference 1.6

Use systems and processes to support a positive culture in the team

Cross reference 1.6

Encourage creative and innovative ways of working within the team

To encourage creative an innovative way of working within the team I hold team meetings and use the Annual Performance Development Review along with individual staff supervisions. For team meetings the agenda is posted prior to the meeting and staff are encouraged to add items to it.
There may be a clear idea of the outcome the team needs to achieve, staff are encouraged to participate in finding and developing ideas on how we will achieve it,
Helping the feeling of being empowered and valued. Meetings are also used to review and give feedback on past actions and outcomes, and should it not be as positive as hoped, we will then work together to look at how to adapt our approach.

Be able to support a shared vision within the team for a health and social care or young children’s setting

Identify the factors that influence the vision and strategic direction of the team

The vision and strategic direction of the team is influenced by the Isle of Man Government Adult Learning Disability Service Strategy 2014 – 2019.
Its main priorities are Personalization of services, Safeguarding, employment, health and housing. It states that individuals should be included and supported in the community, have information about services so they can participate in decision making relative to their lives, and families and carer should be involved in the planning process.

Communicate the vision and strategic direction to team members

The vision and strategic direction are communicated to the team members through effective communication.
A key part of the Strategy was rebalancing of the Service. Regular newsletters and updates are sent from my line which I print out and make available to all staff.
Actions and goals from the Strategy are included in the staffs Performance Development Review to help to demonstrate their understanding of the strategy and its implementation.

Work with others to promote to promote a shared vision within the team

Shared visions within the team are promoted through the Person Centred Planning Process; which provides individual support, with the service user at the center of their own plan. Other professionals such as medical practitioners are involved through Health Check Assessments and Health Action Plans.
Other carers and family members are involved as they are part of partnership working for planning.

Evaluate how the vision and strategic direction of the team influences team practice

Evaluation of the vision and strategic direction is achieved through review of individual’s Person-Centred Planning outcomes, and for staff the review of agreed objectives set down in Personal Development Reviews and supervision sessions, to ensure that the vision has been put into practice.

Be able to develop a plan with team members to meet agreed objectives for a health and social care or children’s and young people’s setting

Identify team objectives

Team objectives are agreed through staff meetings. Agendas are set by the senior and the staff team they are then discussed and solutions, actions along with time scales are sought and set through team discussion.

Analyse how the Skills, interests, knowledge and expertise within the team can meet agreed objectives

Skills, interests, knowledge and expertise within the team can meet the agreed objective when positive and motivated, if they feel confident of success through prior knowledge and experience. If the team are at a level regarding abilities the possibility of the agreed timescales for outcomes being achieved, as staff do not have to learn new skills before commencing the work itself.

Facilitate team members to actively participate in the planning process

Staff is actively encouraged to participate in the planning process by ensuring their rota matches the meetings, so they are available to attend staff meetings and individual supervision/ personal development review meetings, as the team is more effective with all members involved.

Encourage the sharing of skills and knowledge between team members

Sharing of skills and knowledge between team members is encouraged to pass on knowledge and lead to a more rounded and capable team. This can promote trust and build esteem as they feel valued. Also sharing knowledge can lead to new ideas and new ways of working as individuals can often get stuck in a routine.

Agree Roles and responsibilities with team members

Roles and responsibilities are agreed at staff meetings, this way all staff can put themselves forward for the role, there may be a handover period when two people work together to pass on their knowledge in this area, to the new person
Agreeing roles and responsibilities at staff meetings helps to prevent confusion as all all staff are aware of who is responsible for what role, these roles are then reviewed in supervision and pdrs.

Be able to support individual team members to work towards agreed objectives in a health and social care or young people’s setting

Set personal work objectives with team members based on agreed objectives

I set personal objectives with team members based on agreed objectives, through the Staff Personal Development Review, and through staff supervisions. Here individual objectives are discussed and set that relate to the individual and workplace while reflecting wider operational, objectives.
We discuss and agree opportunities for development and growth and the support required, this may be through training, working alongside others or by setting projects that will allow them to take on new roles.
Objectives are SMART goaled, so they can be effectively reviewed.
Staff are advised that if are feel unsure of any issues relating to the objectives I am available to talk through any concerns and that it is not failing to seek advice or reassurance.
Work with team members to identify opportunities for development and growth

Cross reference 5.1

Provide advice and support to team members to make the most of identified development

The Pdr’s are held 2/3 times a year. After the objectives are set then a review to discuss if any further support is required to achieve positive outcomes.
This may include creating time /opportunity when on duty, or some other resources may be required i.e. training. We may also need to adjust the objective to react to any changes required
It is also important to offer feedback on performance as this may help to motivate and encourage.

Use solution focused approach to support team members to address identified challenges

Solution focused approach is used when the desired outcome is known, and the focus is on making positive change and not on the problem. For example, when not all team members are demonstrating skills and abilities in the needed area, rather than concentrating on who can’t, the focus should be on the team members that do have the skills and abilities and for them to share these skills with the other staff. Focusing on the positives not the negatives.
In the staff Performance Development Review there are positive behavioral indicators that must be demonstrated. By knowing what is expected from staff I can work with them to agree the solution to achieve the outcome.

Be able to manage team performance in a health and social care or young people’s setting

Monitor and evaluate progress towards agreed objectives

Cross reference 5.1

Provide feedback on performance to the individual and the team

Cross reference 5.1 2.4 and 6.4

Provide recognition when individual and team objectives have been achieved

Recognition when individual objectives have been achieved is provided at the end of the annual Personal Development Review where achievement of objectives is rated as Exceeded, Achieved, or Not Achieved, demonstration of competencies is rated as Highly Effective, Effective, or Working Towards, and Overall Performance is rated as Outstanding, Very Good, Good, Below Expectations, or Unacceptable.
Recognition to the team is provided through reviewing the units annual plan, annual key performance indicators (of attendance, number of staff meetings, number of pcp’s held, number of supervisions) and through Financial and Regulation and Inspection audits. This information is made available to all staff and is discussed at staff meetings. It is also passed on to line management and their feedback is also given to staff.

Explain how team members are managed when performance does not meet requirements

When performance does not meet requirements, it is important to review the action and approaches of both the staff member and the senior, as we may be able to learn from the experience and positively affect future working methods.
Negative feedback should be constructive, based on fact not on opinions, looking to support the staff member to make improvements and positive changes in their work practice..
There may be occasions when performance has not met requirements and help/support has been given, yet the staff member still fails to meet minimum standards. At this stage it may be appropriate to undertake the Departments Capability Procedures, formally supporting the staff member to improve their performance with clear objectives and review dates. If there is no improvement ultimately the staff member may be dismissed from their job.

Understand the features of effective team performance within a health and social care or children and young people’s setting

Explain the features of effective team performance

You can use the cycle of Bruce Tuckman’s 1965 Theory of ‘Forming, Storming, Norming and Performing’, to show the stages of team performance and development

‘Norming’ and ‘Performing’ stage, shows features of effective team performance
The team have a clear shared sense of purpose in line with organisational objectives and all members of the team work towards achieving these goals, understanding their own role in the team and their part in the outcome.

Identify the challenges experienced by developing teams

The challenges to developing teams can be seen in the ‘Forming’ and ‘Storming’ stages. At these stages team members are still getting to know each other and have not yet established respect and trust. They are unaware of each other’s abilities, skills or knowledge, and have not experienced success together.
There may also team members trying to exert their dominance within the team, this can cause conflict and be destructive at this stage delaying the building of trust and respect. Individual agendas may then take precedence over common team goals and objectives and this can lead to personal conflicts between staff.
Some members may not feel comfortable speaking up or may feel intimidated by other people, so communication can be difficult.

Identify the challenges experienced by established teams

The challenges experienced by established teams is that having experienced success, they can become unmotivated, feeling that they have done all they can within the confines of the team and may seek to move on to new experiences and challenges.
This can lead to new members being introduced to the team, which then then can begin the Tuckman’s cycle all over again and return to the ‘Forming’ stage, and new recruits to the team can be met with suspicion and lack of acceptance.
Individuals and the team may become stuck in the existing methods of working and become resistant to change, or adapting to new working procedures, policies or guidelines.

Explain how challenges to effective team performance can be overcome

Challenges to effective team performance can be overcome by continuing to motivate the team and encouraging them to share skills and knowledge. This can be done through effective communication,
Team meetings where new initiatives and ways of working are discussed, and ways agreed of how to implement them into the workplace.
Encouraging a positive attitude toward change and seeing it as opportunity rather than something to be feared and discussing and promoting the team’s objectives. Team successes can be shared which promotes the ‘feel good’ factor.
Supervisions, where appropriate individual team members can be motivated through praising and identifying good work and encouraging them to pass these approaches on to colleagues it is important to ensure staff remain happy in the workplace and discuss and resolve any issues that are affecting them
Personal Development Review operational objectives are used to set individual objectives so that the team member remains ‘connected’ to and a part of the wider service.

Analyse how different styles of leadership and management can influence outcomes of team performance

Different styles of leadership and management can influence outcomes of team performance in different ways. A successful manager should be able to blend different styles dependent on circumstances to achieve positive outcomes.
Autocratic management style involves the manager being the decision maker and passing these decisions to staff for them to be carried out, staff are not consulted in the process. There will not be a sense of team performance, and staff are unable to feel as though they are part of any positive outcomes. Due to not being consulted they would feel unable to make suggestions as their views are not encouraged.
As decisions are made solely by the manager none of the positives of effective teamwork can be enjoyed. Success and failure lie only with the manager. Leaving the staff feeling undervalued and as a result pride and quality of their work would reduce
Autocratic management may be successful when reacting to immediate situations that require immediate decisions, but as a blanket management style is ultimately flawed.
This can be seen in McGregor’s Theory X view of workers.

Democratic management style involves staff in the decision-making process. Communication is two-way Manager and staff work together and staff is encouraged to put forward their ideas and viewpoints. Sharing the success and failures and are more likely to be committed and motivated toward positive outcomes. Staff feel empowered and part of the organisation.
An issue with democratic management is that decisions are not immediate, meetings must be organised and undertaken, communication must be effective, and these things can take time, this can be seen in McGregor’s Theory Y view of workers.

Analyse methods of developing and maintaining trust and accountability

To develop and maintain trust and accountability which supports the feeling of being valued and empowered promoting a positive staff team This can be described as the ‘Norming’ stage where all staff have clear understanding or team and individual roles and positive behaviours a clear understanding of the job requirements set down in the organisation job descriptions and organisational structure staff can see what their own role responsibilities and for what they are accountable for.
Policies, procedures and guidelines must be in place and understood, clearly defining levels of accountability.
Using the Annual Performance Development Review with objectives linked in to organisational objectives and supervisions staff can see their own responsibilities and accountabilities.
Effective team work will often have outcomes where staff agree to undertake certain actions. As a senior it is part of my role to support the individual to complete the tasks by ensuring they have the knowledge skills, abilities, training and equipment to carry out the tasks

As a senior I must show the same positive behaviours expected from the staff team, to follow through with agreed actions of my own and maintain a positive approach to work and my colleagues.
Staff must be treated equally and fairly in all areas, including the organisation of rotas, the sharing of tasks, allocation of leave and treated with equal dignity and respect.
As a senior I must ensure that I maintain confidentiality with staff, that supervisions remain confidential and that staff feel encouraged and supported to speak their minds, creating an environment where staff feel relaxed and confident, not only with myself as a senior but with each other as a team to provide a supportive workplace.

Compare methods of addressing conflicts within a team

Comparing methods of addressing conflicts within a team using the Direct Approach, Bargaining, Enforcement, Retreat, and De-emphasis (Nelson, 1995), which states
Direct Approach: This may be the best approach of all. It concentrates on the leader confronting the issue head-on. Though conflict is uncomfortable to deal with, it is best to look at issues objectively and to face them as they are. If criticism is used, it must be constructive to the recipients. This approach counts on the techniques of problem-solving and normally leaves everyone with a sense of resolution, because issues are brought to the surface and dealt with.
Bargaining: This is an excellent technique when both parties have ideas on a solution yet cannot find common ground. Often a third party, such as a team leader, is needed to help find the compromise. Compromise involves give and take on both sides, however, and usually ends up with both walking away equally dissatisfied.
Enforcement of Team Rules: Avoid using this method if possible, it can bring about hard feelings toward the leader and the team. This technique is only used when it is obvious that a member does not want to be a team player and refuses to work with the rest. If enforcement has to be used on an individual, it may be best for that person to find another team.
Retreat: Only use this method when the problem isn’t real to begin with. By simply avoiding it or working around it, a leader can often delay long enough for the individual to cool off. When used in the right environment by an experienced leader this technique can help to prevent minor incidents that are the result of someone having a bad day from becoming real problems that should never have occurred.
De-emphasis: This is a form of bargaining where the emphasis is on the areas of agreement. When parties realize that there are areas where they are in agreement, they can often begin to move in a new direction.

Be able to support a positive culture within the team for a health and social care or young peoples setting

Identify the components of a positive culture within own team

Cross reference 1.1 and 1.6

Demonstrate how own practice supports a positive culture in the team

Cross reference 1.6

Use systems and processes to support a positive culture in the team

Cross reference 1.6

Encourage creative and innovative ways of working within the team

To encourage creative an innovative way of working within the team I hold team meetings and use the Annual Performance Development Review along with individual staff supervisions. For team meetings the agenda is posted prior to the meeting and staff are encouraged to add items to it.
There may be a clear idea of the outcome the team needs to achieve, staff are encouraged to participate in finding and developing ideas on how we will achieve it,
Helping the feeling of being empowered and valued. Meetings are also used to review and give feedback on past actions and outcomes, and should it not be as positive as hoped, we will then work together to look at how to adapt our approach.

Be able to support a shared vision within the team for a health and social care or young children’s setting

Identify the factors that influence the vision and strategic direction of the team

The vision and strategic direction of the team is influenced by the Isle of Man Government Adult Learning Disability Service Strategy 2014 – 2019.
Its main priorities are Personalization of services, Safeguarding, employment, health and housing. It states that individuals should be included and supported in the community, have information about services so they can participate in decision making relative to their lives, and families and carer should be involved in the planning process.

Communicate the vision and strategic direction to team members

The vision and strategic direction are communicated to the team members through effective communication.
A key part of the Strategy was rebalancing of the Service. Regular newsletters and updates are sent from my line which I print out and make available to all staff.
Actions and goals from the Strategy are included in the staffs Performance Development Review to help to demonstrate their understanding of the strategy and its implementation.

Work with others to promote to promote a shared vision within the team

Shared visions within the team are promoted through the Person Centred Planning Process; which provides individual support, with the service user at the center of their own plan. Other professionals such as medical practitioners are involved through Health Check Assessments and Health Action Plans.
Other carers and family members are involved as they are part of partnership working for planning.

Evaluate how the vision and strategic direction of the team influences team practice

Evaluation of the vision and strategic direction is achieved through review of individual’s Person-Centred Planning outcomes, and for staff the review of agreed objectives set down in Personal Development Reviews and supervision sessions, to ensure that the vision has been put into practice.

Be able to develop a plan with team members to meet agreed objectives for a health and social care or children’s and young people’s setting

Identify team objectives

Team objectives are agreed through staff meetings. Agendas are set by the senior and the staff team they are then discussed and solutions, actions along with time scales are sought and set through team discussion.

Analyse how the Skills, interests, knowledge and expertise within the team can meet agreed objectives

Skills, interests, knowledge and expertise within the team can meet the agreed objective when positive and motivated, if they feel confident of success through prior knowledge and experience. If the team are at a level regarding abilities the possibility of the agreed timescales for outcomes being achieved, as staff do not have to learn new skills before commencing the work itself.

Facilitate team members to actively participate in the planning process

Staff is actively encouraged to participate in the planning process by ensuring their rota matches the meetings, so they are available to attend staff meetings and individual supervision/ personal development review meetings, as the team is more effective with all members involved.

Encourage the sharing of skills and knowledge between team members

Sharing of skills and knowledge between team members is encouraged to pass on knowledge and lead to a more rounded and capable team. This can promote trust and build esteem as they feel valued. Also sharing knowledge can lead to new ideas and new ways of working as individuals can often get stuck in a routine.

Agree Roles and responsibilities with team members

Roles and responsibilities are agreed at staff meetings, this way all staff can put themselves forward for the role, there may be a handover period when two people work together to pass on their knowledge in this area, to the new person
Agreeing roles and responsibilities at staff meetings helps to prevent confusion as all all staff are aware of who is responsible for what role, these roles are then reviewed in supervision and pdrs.

Be able to support individual team members to work towards agreed objectives in a health and social care or young people’s setting

Set personal work objectives with team members based on agreed objectives

I set personal objectives with team members based on agreed objectives, through the Staff Personal Development Review, and through staff supervisions. Here individual objectives are discussed and set that relate to the individual and workplace while reflecting wider operational, objectives.
We discuss and agree opportunities for development and growth and the support required, this may be through training, working alongside others or by setting projects that will allow them to take on new roles.
Objectives are SMART goaled, so they can be effectively reviewed.
Staff are advised that if are feel unsure of any issues relating to the objectives I am available to talk through any concerns and that it is not failing to seek advice or reassurance.
Work with team members to identify opportunities for development and growth

Cross reference 5.1

Provide advice and support to team members to make the most of identified development

The Pdr’s are held 2/3 times a year. After the objectives are set then a review to discuss if any further support is required to achieve positive outcomes.
This may include creating time /opportunity when on duty, or some other resources may be required i.e. training. We may also need to adjust the objective to react to any changes required
It is also important to offer feedback on performance as this may help to motivate and encourage.

Use solution focused approach to support team members to address identified challenges

Solution focused approach is used when the desired outcome is known, and the focus is on making positive change and not on the problem. For example, when not all team members are demonstrating skills and abilities in the needed area, rather than concentrating on who can’t, the focus should be on the team members that do have the skills and abilities and for them to share these skills with the other staff. Focusing on the positives not the negatives.
In the staff Performance Development Review there are positive behavioral indicators that must be demonstrated. By knowing what is expected from staff I can work with them to agree the solution to achieve the outcome.

Be able to manage team performance in a health and social care or young people’s setting

Monitor and evaluate progress towards agreed objectives

Cross reference 5.1

Provide feedback on performance to the individual and the team

Cross reference 5.1 2.4 and 6.4

Provide recognition when individual and team objectives have been achieved

Recognition when individual objectives have been achieved is provided at the end of the annual Personal Development Review where achievement of objectives is rated as Exceeded, Achieved, or Not Achieved, demonstration of competencies is rated as Highly Effective, Effective, or Working Towards, and Overall Performance is rated as Outstanding, Very Good, Good, Below Expectations, or Unacceptable.
Recognition to the team is provided through reviewing the units annual plan, annual key performance indicators (of attendance, number of staff meetings, number of pcp’s held, number of supervisions) and through Financial and Regulation and Inspection audits. This information is made available to all staff and is discussed at staff meetings. It is also passed on to line management and their feedback is also given to staff.

Explain how team members are managed when performance does not meet requirements

When performance does not meet requirements, it is important to review the action and approaches of both the staff member and the senior, as we may be able to learn from the experience and positively affect future working methods.
Negative feedback should be constructive, based on fact not on opinions, looking to support the staff member to make improvements and positive changes in their work practice..
There may be occasions when performance has not met requirements and help/support has been given, yet the staff member still fails to meet minimum standards. At this stage it may be appropriate to undertake the Departments Capability Procedures, formally supporting the staff member to improve their performance with clear objectives and review dates. If there is no improvement ultimately the staff member may be dismissed from their job.

Understand the features of effective team performance within a health and social care or children and young people’s setting

Explain the features of effective team performance

You can use the cycle of Bruce Tuckman’s 1965 Theory of ‘Forming, Storming, Norming and Performing’, to show the stages of team performance and development

‘Norming’ and ‘Performing’ stage, shows features of effective team performance
The team have a clear shared sense of purpose in line with organisational objectives and all members of the team work towards achieving these goals, understanding their own role in the team and their part in the outcome.

Identify the challenges experienced by developing teams

The challenges to developing teams can be seen in the ‘Forming’ and ‘Storming’ stages. At these stages team members are still getting to know each other and have not yet established respect and trust. They are unaware of each other’s abilities, skills or knowledge, and have not experienced success together.
There may also team members trying to exert their dominance within the team, this can cause conflict and be destructive at this stage delaying the building of trust and respect. Individual agendas may then take precedence over common team goals and objectives and this can lead to personal conflicts between staff.
Some members may not feel comfortable speaking up or may feel intimidated by other people, so communication can be difficult.

Identify the challenges experienced by established teams

The challenges experienced by established teams is that having experienced success, they can become unmotivated, feeling that they have done all they can within the confines of the team and may seek to move on to new experiences and challenges.
This can lead to new members being introduced to the team, which then then can begin the Tuckman’s cycle all over again and return to the ‘Forming’ stage, and new recruits to the team can be met with suspicion and lack of acceptance.
Individuals and the team may become stuck in the existing methods of working and become resistant to change, or adapting to new working procedures, policies or guidelines.

Explain how challenges to effective team performance can be overcome

Challenges to effective team performance can be overcome by continuing to motivate the team and encouraging them to share skills and knowledge. This can be done through effective communication,
Team meetings where new initiatives and ways of working are discussed, and ways agreed of how to implement them into the workplace.
Encouraging a positive attitude toward change and seeing it as opportunity rather than something to be feared and discussing and promoting the team’s objectives. Team successes can be shared which promotes the ‘feel good’ factor.
Supervisions, where appropriate individual team members can be motivated through praising and identifying good work and encouraging them to pass these approaches on to colleagues it is important to ensure staff remain happy in the workplace and discuss and resolve any issues that are affecting them
Personal Development Review operational objectives are used to set individual objectives so that the team member remains ‘connected’ to and a part of the wider service.

Analyse how different styles of leadership and management can influence outcomes of team performance

Different styles of leadership and management can influence outcomes of team performance in different ways. A successful manager should be able to blend different styles dependent on circumstances to achieve positive outcomes.
Autocratic management style involves the manager being the decision maker and passing these decisions to staff for them to be carried out, staff are not consulted in the process. There will not be a sense of team performance, and staff are unable to feel as though they are part of any positive outcomes. Due to not being consulted they would feel unable to make suggestions as their views are not encouraged.
As decisions are made solely by the manager none of the positives of effective teamwork can be enjoyed. Success and failure lie only with the manager. Leaving the staff feeling undervalued and as a result pride and quality of their work would reduce
Autocratic management may be successful when reacting to immediate situations that require immediate decisions, but as a blanket management style is ultimately flawed.
This can be seen in McGregor’s Theory X view of workers.

Democratic management style involves staff in the decision-making process. Communication is two-way Manager and staff work together and staff is encouraged to put forward their ideas and viewpoints. Sharing the success and failures and are more likely to be committed and motivated toward positive outcomes. Staff feel empowered and part of the organisation.
An issue with democratic management is that decisions are not immediate, meetings must be organised and undertaken, communication must be effective, and these things can take time, this can be seen in McGregor’s Theory Y view of workers.

Analyse methods of developing and maintaining trust and accountability

To develop and maintain trust and accountability which supports the feeling of being valued and empowered promoting a positive staff team This can be described as the ‘Norming’ stage where all staff have clear understanding or team and individual roles and positive behaviours a clear understanding of the job requirements set down in the organisation job descriptions and organisational structure staff can see what their own role responsibilities and for what they are accountable for.
Policies, procedures and guidelines must be in place and understood, clearly defining levels of accountability.
Using the Annual Performance Development Review with objectives linked in to organisational objectives and supervisions staff can see their own responsibilities and accountabilities.
Effective team work will often have outcomes where staff agree to undertake certain actions. As a senior it is part of my role to support the individual to complete the tasks by ensuring they have the knowledge skills, abilities, training and equipment to carry out the tasks

As a senior I must show the same positive behaviours expected from the staff team, to follow through with agreed actions of my own and maintain a positive approach to work and my colleagues.
Staff must be treated equally and fairly in all areas, including the organisation of rotas, the sharing of tasks, allocation of leave and treated with equal dignity and respect.
As a senior I must ensure that I maintain confidentiality with staff, that supervisions remain confidential and that staff feel encouraged and supported to speak their minds, creating an environment where staff feel relaxed and confident, not only with myself as a senior but with each other as a team to provide a supportive workplace.

Compare methods of addressing conflicts within a team

Comparing methods of addressing conflicts within a team using the Direct Approach, Bargaining, Enforcement, Retreat, and De-emphasis (Nelson, 1995), which states
Direct Approach: This may be the best approach of all. It concentrates on the leader confronting the issue head-on. Though conflict is uncomfortable to deal with, it is best to look at issues objectively and to face them as they are. If criticism is used, it must be constructive to the recipients. This approach counts on the techniques of problem-solving and normally leaves everyone with a sense of resolution, because issues are brought to the surface and dealt with.
Bargaining: This is an excellent technique when both parties have ideas on a solution yet cannot find common ground. Often a third party, such as a team leader, is needed to help find the compromise. Compromise involves give and take on both sides, however, and usually ends up with both walking away equally dissatisfied.
Enforcement of Team Rules: Avoid using this method if possible, it can bring about hard feelings toward the leader and the team. This technique is only used when it is obvious that a member does not want to be a team player and refuses to work with the rest. If enforcement has to be used on an individual, it may be best for that person to find another team.
Retreat: Only use this method when the problem isn’t real to begin with. By simply avoiding it or working around it, a leader can often delay long enough for the individual to cool off. When used in the right environment by an experienced leader this technique can help to prevent minor incidents that are the result of someone having a bad day from becoming real problems that should never have occurred.
De-emphasis: This is a form of bargaining where the emphasis is on the areas of agreement. When parties realize that there are areas where they are in agreement, they can often begin to move in a new direction.

Be able to support a positive culture within the team for a health and social care or young peoples setting

Identify the components of a positive culture within own team

Cross reference 1.1 and 1.6

Demonstrate how own practice supports a positive culture in the team

Cross reference 1.6

Use systems and processes to support a positive culture in the team

Cross reference 1.6

Encourage creative and innovative ways of working within the team

To encourage creative an innovative way of working within the team I hold team meetings and use the Annual Performance Development Review along with individual staff supervisions. For team meetings the agenda is posted prior to the meeting and staff are encouraged to add items to it.
There may be a clear idea of the outcome the team needs to achieve, staff are encouraged to participate in finding and developing ideas on how we will achieve it,
Helping the feeling of being empowered and valued. Meetings are also used to review and give feedback on past actions and outcomes, and should it not be as positive as hoped, we will then work together to look at how to adapt our approach.

Be able to support a shared vision within the team for a health and social care or young children’s setting

Identify the factors that influence the vision and strategic direction of the team

The vision and strategic direction of the team is influenced by the Isle of Man Government Adult Learning Disability Service Strategy 2014 – 2019.
Its main priorities are Personalization of services, Safeguarding, employment, health and housing. It states that individuals should be included and supported in the community, have information about services so they can participate in decision making relative to their lives, and families and carer should be involved in the planning process.

Communicate the vision and strategic direction to team members

The vision and strategic direction are communicated to the team members through effective communication.
A key part of the Strategy was rebalancing of the Service. Regular newsletters and updates are sent from my line which I print out and make available to all staff.
Actions and goals from the Strategy are included in the staffs Performance Development Review to help to demonstrate their understanding of the strategy and its implementation.

Work with others to promote to promote a shared vision within the team

Shared visions within the team are promoted through the Person Centred Planning Process; which provides individual support, with the service user at the center of their own plan. Other professionals such as medical practitioners are involved through Health Check Assessments and Health Action Plans.
Other carers and family members are involved as they are part of partnership working for planning.

Evaluate how the vision and strategic direction of the team influences team practice

Evaluation of the vision and strategic direction is achieved through review of individual’s Person-Centred Planning outcomes, and for staff the review of agreed objectives set down in Personal Development Reviews and supervision sessions, to ensure that the vision has been put into practice.

Be able to develop a plan with team members to meet agreed objectives for a health and social care or children’s and young people’s setting

Identify team objectives

Team objectives are agreed through staff meetings. Agendas are set by the senior and the staff team they are then discussed and solutions, actions along with time scales are sought and set through team discussion.

Analyse how the Skills, interests, knowledge and expertise within the team can meet agreed objectives

Skills, interests, knowledge and expertise within the team can meet the agreed objective when positive and motivated, if they feel confident of success through prior knowledge and experience. If the team are at a level regarding abilities the possibility of the agreed timescales for outcomes being achieved, as staff do not have to learn new skills before commencing the work itself.

Facilitate team members to actively participate in the planning process

Staff is actively encouraged to participate in the planning process by ensuring their rota matches the meetings, so they are available to attend staff meetings and individual supervision/ personal development review meetings, as the team is more effective with all members involved.

Encourage the sharing of skills and knowledge between team members

Sharing of skills and knowledge between team members is encouraged to pass on knowledge and lead to a more rounded and capable team. This can promote trust and build esteem as they feel valued. Also sharing knowledge can lead to new ideas and new ways of working as individuals can often get stuck in a routine.

Agree Roles and responsibilities with team members

Roles and responsibilities are agreed at staff meetings, this way all staff can put themselves forward for the role, there may be a handover period when two people work together to pass on their knowledge in this area, to the new person
Agreeing roles and responsibilities at staff meetings helps to prevent confusion as all all staff are aware of who is responsible for what role, these roles are then reviewed in supervision and pdrs.

Be able to support individual team members to work towards agreed objectives in a health and social care or young people’s setting

Set personal work objectives with team members based on agreed objectives

I set personal objectives with team members based on agreed objectives, through the Staff Personal Development Review, and through staff supervisions. Here individual objectives are discussed and set that relate to the individual and workplace while reflecting wider operational, objectives.
We discuss and agree opportunities for development and growth and the support required, this may be through training, working alongside others or by setting projects that will allow them to take on new roles.
Objectives are SMART goaled, so they can be effectively reviewed.
Staff are advised that if are feel unsure of any issues relating to the objectives I am available to talk through any concerns and that it is not failing to seek advice or reassurance.
Work with team members to identify opportunities for development and growth

Cross reference 5.1

Provide advice and support to team members to make the most of identified development

The Pdr’s are held 2/3 times a year. After the objectives are set then a review to discuss if any further support is required to achieve positive outcomes.
This may include creating time /opportunity when on duty, or some other resources may be required i.e. training. We may also need to adjust the objective to react to any changes required
It is also important to offer feedback on performance as this may help to motivate and encourage.

Use solution focused approach to support team members to address identified challenges

Solution focused approach is used when the desired outcome is known, and the focus is on making positive change and not on the problem. For example, when not all team members are demonstrating skills and abilities in the needed area, rather than concentrating on who can’t, the focus should be on the team members that do have the skills and abilities and for them to share these skills with the other staff. Focusing on the positives not the negatives.
In the staff Performance Development Review there are positive behavioral indicators that must be demonstrated. By knowing what is expected from staff I can work with them to agree the solution to achieve the outcome.

Be able to manage team performance in a health and social care or young people’s setting

Monitor and evaluate progress towards agreed objectives

Cross reference 5.1

Provide feedback on performance to the individual and the team

Cross reference 5.1 2.4 and 6.4

Provide recognition when individual and team objectives have been achieved

Recognition when individual objectives have been achieved is provided at the end of the annual Personal Development Review where achievement of objectives is rated as Exceeded, Achieved, or Not Achieved, demonstration of competencies is rated as Highly Effective, Effective, or Working Towards, and Overall Performance is rated as Outstanding, Very Good, Good, Below Expectations, or Unacceptable.
Recognition to the team is provided through reviewing the units annual plan, annual key performance indicators (of attendance, number of staff meetings, number of pcp’s held, number of supervisions) and through Financial and Regulation and Inspection audits. This information is made available to all staff and is discussed at staff meetings. It is also passed on to line management and their feedback is also given to staff.

Explain how team members are managed when performance does not meet requirements

When performance does not meet requirements, it is important to review the action and approaches of both the staff member and the senior, as we may be able to learn from the experience and positively affect future working methods.
Negative feedback should be constructive, based on fact not on opinions, looking to support the staff member to make improvements and positive changes in their work practice..
There may be occasions when performance has not met requirements and help/support has been given, yet the staff member still fails to meet minimum standards. At this stage it may be appropriate to undertake the Departments Capability Procedures, formally supporting the staff member to improve their performance with clear objectives and review dates. If there is no improvement ultimately the staff member may be dismissed from their job.

Norming’ and ‘Performing’ stage, shows features of effective team performance
The team have a clear shared sense of purpose in line with organisational objectives and all members of the team work towards achieving these goals, understanding their own role in the team and their part in the outcome.

Identify the challenges experienced by developing teams

The challenges to developing teams can be seen in the ‘Forming’ and ‘Storming’ stages. At these stages team members are still getting to know each other and have not yet established respect and trust. They are unaware of each other’s abilities, skills or knowledge, and have not experienced success together.
There may also team members trying to exert their dominance within the team, this can cause conflict and be destructive at this stage delaying the building of trust and respect. Individual agendas may then take precedence over common team goals and objectives and this can lead to personal conflicts between staff.
Some members may not feel comfortable speaking up or may feel intimidated by other people, so communication can be difficult.

Identify the challenges experienced by established teams

The challenges experienced by established teams is that having experienced success, they can become unmotivated, feeling that they have done all they can within the confines of the team and may seek to move on to new experiences and challenges.
This can lead to new members being introduced to the team, which then then can begin the Tuckman’s cycle all over again and return to the ‘Forming’ stage, and new recruits to the team can be met with suspicion and lack of acceptance.
Individuals and the team may become stuck in the existing methods of working and become resistant to change, or adapting to new working procedures, policies or guidelines.

Explain how challenges to effective team performance can be overcome

Challenges to effective team performance can be overcome by continuing to motivate the team and encouraging them to share skills and knowledge. This can be done through effective communication,
Team meetings where new initiatives and ways of working are discussed, and ways agreed of how to implement them into the workplace.
Encouraging a positive attitude toward change and seeing it as opportunity rather than something to be feared and discussing and promoting the team’s objectives. Team successes can be shared which promotes the ‘feel good’ factor.
Supervisions, where appropriate individual team members can be motivated through praising and identifying good work and encouraging them to pass these approaches on to colleagues it is important to ensure staff remain happy in the workplace and discuss and resolve any issues that are affecting them
Personal Development Review operational objectives are used to set individual objectives so that the team member remains ‘connected’ to and a part of the wider service.

Analyse how different styles of leadership and management can influence outcomes of team performance

Different styles of leadership and management can influence outcomes of team performance in different ways. A successful manager should be able to blend different styles dependent on circumstances to achieve positive outcomes.
Autocratic management style involves the manager being the decision maker and passing these decisions to staff for them to be carried out, staff are not consulted in the process. There will not be a sense of team performance, and staff are unable to feel as though they are part of any positive outcomes. Due to not being consulted they would feel unable to make suggestions as their views are not encouraged.
As decisions are made solely by the manager none of the positives of effective teamwork can be enjoyed. Success and failure lie only with the manager. Leaving the staff feeling undervalued and as a result pride and quality of their work would reduce
Autocratic management may be successful when reacting to immediate situations that require immediate decisions, but as a blanket management style is ultimately flawed.
This can be seen in McGregor’s Theory X view of workers.

Democratic management style involves staff in the decision-making process. Communication is two-way Manager and staff work together and staff is encouraged to put forward their ideas and viewpoints. Sharing the success and failures and are more likely to be committed and motivated toward positive outcomes. Staff feel empowered and part of the organisation.
An issue with democratic management is that decisions are not immediate, meetings must be organised and undertaken, communication must be effective, and these things can take time, this can be seen in McGregor’s Theory Y view of workers.

Analyse methods of developing and maintaining trust and accountability

To develop and maintain trust and accountability which supports the feeling of being valued and empowered promoting a positive staff team This can be described as the ‘Norming’ stage where all staff have clear understanding or team and individual roles and positive behaviours a clear understanding of the job requirements set down in the organisation job descriptions and organisational structure staff can see what their own role responsibilities and for what they are accountable for.
Policies, procedures and guidelines must be in place and understood, clearly defining levels of accountability.
Using the Annual Performance Development Review with objectives linked in to organisational objectives and supervisions staff can see their own responsibilities and accountabilities.
Effective team work will often have outcomes where staff agree to undertake certain actions. As a senior it is part of my role to support the individual to complete the tasks by ensuring they have the knowledge skills, abilities, training and equipment to carry out the tasks

As a senior I must show the same positive behaviours expected from the staff team, to follow through with agreed actions of my own and maintain a positive approach to work and my colleagues.
Staff must be treated equally and fairly in all areas, including the organisation of rotas, the sharing of tasks, allocation of leave and treated with equal dignity and respect.
As a senior I must ensure that I maintain confidentiality with staff, that supervisions remain confidential and that staff feel encouraged and supported to speak their minds, creating an environment where staff feel relaxed and confident, not only with myself as a senior but with each other as a team to provide a supportive workplace.

Compare methods of addressing conflicts within a team

Comparing methods of addressing conflicts within a team using the Direct Approach, Bargaining, Enforcement, Retreat, and De-emphasis (Nelson, 1995), which states
Direct Approach: This may be the best approach of all. It concentrates on the leader confronting the issue head-on. Though conflict is uncomfortable to deal with, it is best to look at issues objectively and to face them as they are. If criticism is used, it must be constructive to the recipients. This approach counts on the techniques of problem-solving and normally leaves everyone with a sense of resolution, because issues are brought to the surface and dealt with.
Bargaining: This is an excellent technique when both parties have ideas on a solution yet cannot find common ground. Often a third party, such as a team leader, is needed to help find the compromise. Compromise involves give and take on both sides, however, and usually ends up with both walking away equally dissatisfied.
Enforcement of Team Rules: Avoid using this method if possible, it can bring about hard feelings toward the leader and the team. This technique is only used when it is obvious that a member does not want to be a team player and refuses to work with the rest. If enforcement has to be used on an individual, it may be best for that person to find another team.
Retreat: Only use this method when the problem isn’t real to begin with. By simply avoiding it or working around it, a leader can often delay long enough for the individual to cool off. When used in the right environment by an experienced leader this technique can help to prevent minor incidents that are the result of someone having a bad day from becoming real problems that should never have occurred.
De-emphasis: This is a form of bargaining where the emphasis is on the areas of agreement. When parties realize that there are areas where they are in agreement, they can often begin to move in a new direction.

Be able to support a positive culture within the team for a health and social care or young peoples setting

Identify the components of a positive culture within own team

Cross reference 1.1 and 1.6

Demonstrate how own practice supports a positive culture in the team

Cross reference 1.6

Use systems and processes to support a positive culture in the team

Cross reference 1.6

Encourage creative and innovative ways of working within the team

To encourage creative an innovative way of working within the team I hold team meetings and use the Annual Performance Development Review along with individual staff supervisions. For team meetings the agenda is posted prior to the meeting and staff are encouraged to add items to it.
There may be a clear idea of the outcome the team needs to achieve, staff are encouraged to participate in finding and developing ideas on how we will achieve it,
Helping the feeling of being empowered and valued. Meetings are also used to review and give feedback on past actions and outcomes, and should it not be as positive as hoped, we will then work together to look at how to adapt our approach.

Be able to support a shared vision within the team for a health and social care or young children’s setting

Identify the factors that influence the vision and strategic direction of the team

The vision and strategic direction of the team is influenced by the Isle of Man Government Adult Learning Disability Service Strategy 2014 – 2019.
Its main priorities are Personalization of services, Safeguarding, employment, health and housing. It states that individuals should be included and supported in the community, have information about services so they can participate in decision making relative to their lives, and families and carer should be involved in the planning process.

Communicate the vision and strategic direction to team members

The vision and strategic direction are communicated to the team members through effective communication.
A key part of the Strategy was rebalancing of the Service. Regular newsletters and updates are sent from my line which I print out and make available to all staff.
Actions and goals from the Strategy are included in the staffs Performance Development Review to help to demonstrate their understanding of the strategy and its implementation.

Work with others to promote to promote a shared vision within the team

Shared visions within the team are promoted through the Person Centred Planning Process; which provides individual support, with the service user at the center of their own plan. Other professionals such as medical practitioners are involved through Health Check Assessments and Health Action Plans.
Other carers and family members are involved as they are part of partnership working for planning.

Evaluate how the vision and strategic direction of the team influences team practice

Evaluation of the vision and strategic direction is achieved through review of individual’s Person-Centred Planning outcomes, and for staff the review of agreed objectives set down in Personal Development Reviews and supervision sessions, to ensure that the vision has been put into practice.

Be able to develop a plan with team members to meet agreed objectives for a health and social care or children’s and young people’s setting

Identify team objectives

Team objectives are agreed through staff meetings. Agendas are set by the senior and the staff team they are then discussed and solutions, actions along with time scales are sought and set through team discussion.

Analyse how the Skills, interests, knowledge and expertise within the team can meet agreed objectives

Skills, interests, knowledge and expertise within the team can meet the agreed objective when positive and motivated, if they feel confident of success through prior knowledge and experience. If the team are at a level regarding abilities the possibility of the agreed timescales for outcomes being achieved, as staff do not have to learn new skills before commencing the work itself.

Facilitate team members to actively participate in the planning process

Staff is actively encouraged to participate in the planning process by ensuring their rota matches the meetings, so they are available to attend staff meetings and individual supervision/ personal development review meetings, as the team is more effective with all members involved.

Encourage the sharing of skills and knowledge between team members

Sharing of skills and knowledge between team members is encouraged to pass on knowledge and lead to a more rounded and capable team. This can promote trust and build esteem as they feel valued. Also sharing knowledge can lead to new ideas and new ways of working as individuals can often get stuck in a routine.

Agree Roles and responsibilities with team members

Roles and responsibilities are agreed at staff meetings, this way all staff can put themselves forward for the role, there may be a handover period when two people work together to pass on their knowledge in this area, to the new person
Agreeing roles and responsibilities at staff meetings helps to prevent confusion as all all staff are aware of who is responsible for what role, these roles are then reviewed in supervision and pdrs.

Be able to support individual team members to work towards agreed objectives in a health and social care or young people’s setting

Set personal work objectives with team members based on agreed objectives

I set personal objectives with team members based on agreed objectives, through the Staff Personal Development Review, and through staff supervisions. Here individual objectives are discussed and set that relate to the individual and workplace while reflecting wider operational, objectives.
We discuss and agree opportunities for development and growth and the support required, this may be through training, working alongside others or by setting projects that will allow them to take on new roles.
Objectives are SMART goaled, so they can be effectively reviewed.
Staff are advised that if are feel unsure of any issues relating to the objectives I am available to talk through any concerns and that it is not failing to seek advice or reassurance.
Work with team members to identify opportunities for development and growth

Cross reference 5.1

Provide advice and support to team members to make the most of identified development

The Pdr’s are held 2/3 times a year. After the objectives are set then a review to discuss if any further support is required to achieve positive outcomes.
This may include creating time /opportunity when on duty, or some other resources may be required i.e. training. We may also need to adjust the objective to react to any changes required
It is also important to offer feedback on performance as this may help to motivate and encourage.

Use solution focused approach to support team members to address identified challenges

Solution focused approach is used when the desired outcome is known, and the focus is on making positive change and not on the problem. For example, when not all team members are demonstrating skills and abilities in the needed area, rather than concentrating on who can’t, the focus should be on the team members that do have the skills and abilities and for them to share these skills with the other staff. Focusing on the positives not the negatives.
In the staff Performance Development Review there are positive behavioral indicators that must be demonstrated. By knowing what is expected from staff I can work with them to agree the solution to achieve the outcome.

Be able to manage team performance in a health and social care or young people’s setting

Monitor and evaluate progress towards agreed objectives

Cross reference 5.1

Provide feedback on performance to the individual and the team

Cross reference 5.1 2.4 and 6.4

Provide recognition when individual and team objectives have been achieved

Recognition when individual objectives have been achieved is provided at the end of the annual Personal Development Review where achievement of objectives is rated as Exceeded, Achieved, or Not Achieved, demonstration of competencies is rated as Highly Effective, Effective, or Working Towards, and Overall Performance is rated as Outstanding, Very Good, Good, Below Expectations, or Unacceptable.
Recognition to the team is provided through reviewing the units annual plan, annual key performance indicators (of attendance, number of staff meetings, number of pcp’s held, number of supervisions) and through Financial and Regulation and Inspection audits. This information is made available to all staff and is discussed at staff meetings. It is also passed on to line management and their feedback is also given to staff.

Explain how team members are managed when performance does not meet requirements

When performance does not meet requirements, it is important to review the action and approaches of both the staff member and the senior, as we may be able to learn from the experience and positively affect future working methods.
Negative feedback should be constructive, based on fact not on opinions, looking to support the staff member to make improvements and positive changes in their work practice..
There may be occasions when performance has not met requirements and help/support has been given, yet the staff member still fails to meet minimum standards. At this stage it may be appropriate to undertake the Departments Capability Procedures, formally supporting the staff member to improve their performance with clear objectives and review dates. If there is no improvement ultimately the staff member may be dismissed from their job.

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