This sonnet is a good example of the limitlessness of love

This sonnet is a good example of the limitlessness of love. “Love is not love which alters when it alteration finds” (2). Nothing can affect or change love in any way. Being in love is something so sincere, can be both perfect and imperfect at the same time. Things happens along in life that can take the importance of love away from us, but Shakespeare was trying to represent the simplest element that this cannot be done. When love is true, when it’s real and deep, it can’t be changed. Shakespeare uses similes a lot throughout this sonnet to show this fact. “Love’s not time’s fool” (12) is an example of this. Time is love’s worst adversary. Love is always stronger than time. When in love, you feel as if a second is days and months, because of being with the one you love is as if you were standing still in time. It feels as if the world is moving around you, but the only thing that matters is your love. This may seem corny to many people, but to those who have felt love, it is the most amazing thing that exists. This is what Shakespeare was trying to portray. Love is something that is so great and powerful, that it cannot be measured.

Shakespeare believes that his definition of love is true. “If this be error and upon me proved,” (13). He assumes that if his argument about love is proven to be wrong, then no man has ever loved. Just how secure the poet is in his standards of friendship and love, which he hopes that he and the youth can achieve, is evident in this concluding couplet; he stakes his own poetry as his wager that love is all he has described it to be.