The second half of the twentieth century witnessed a sudden spike in the number of players in international power games

The second half of the twentieth century witnessed a sudden spike in the number of players in international power games. Influence in affairs of global importance stopped being restricted to only the governments of sovereign states; it suddenly began to include the NGO you got monthly newsletters from, the terrorist organizations you read of in the morning newspaper, and the chain restaurant you ate dinner at last night. The lines between government institutions and our current focus – these individuals and organizations in no way affiliated to governments – have begun to become more and more blurred.

The amount of power these solitary bodies wield is astonishing. I refer not only to the commonly known ‘Violent’ Non-State Actors, but also the more peaceful entities; organizations such as Amnesty International, Greenpeace – even, partly, the United Nations itself. There is no doubt that the former as well as the latter have, indeed, contributed tremendously to the moulding of international politics to its current form. However, this, I feel, is the matter under debate. For is the current predicament of international politics that desirable of a position for us to be in?