rhetorical analysis is not in itself a new method

rhetorical analysis is not in itself a new method.
Rhetoric is the art of composing a persuasive discourse. Rhetorical analysis must be conducted critically.
Every situation of discourse involves the presence of three elements: the speaker (or author), the speech (or text), and the audience (or recipient). Classical rhetoric distinguishes, consequently, three factors of persuasion that contribute to the quality of a speech: the authority of the speaker, the argumentation of the speech and the emotions that it arouses in the audience.
The diversity of situations and audiences greatly influences the way of speaking. Classical rhetoric, since Aristotle, admits the distinction of three genres of eloquence: the judicial genre (before the courts), the deliberative genre (in the political assemblies), and the demonstrative genre (in the celebrations). Rhetoric in the Hellenistic culture.
The rhetorical analyzes, however, have their limits. When they content themselves with being descriptive, their results often do not have more than a stylistic interest. Fundamentally synchronous, they can not pretend to be an independent method that would suffice to itself.
The language with which we communicate every day is twisted. Without realizing or often intentionally, we use metaphors to explain something, change the order of events to create more suspense or omit certain words that we substitute by gestures.
Now we will return to the Rhetoric to specify its current functions:
Persuasive function: it is its most classic function in which it tries to convince the receiver.
Propaganda function: trying to achieve the adherence of the receiver to a political or religious idea.
Constructive function: through the use of rhetorical figures you can build a message with a specific purpose and aimed at a specific audience.
Communicative function: Rhetoric takes the meaning of strict language to transform it into a figurative language, a new message capable of convincing and persuading.